Choosing A New Digital Camera

Written by  on March 1, 2010 

Taking pictures in the hope that at least half would develop and then tripping down top the processor after your holiday or sightseeing. There is a multitude of options from the expensive to inexpensive that allow you to take your pictures, view the results and decide which pictures to save for future printing on your home PC or delete as unsatisfactory. All the prior big brands in the camera market, such as Nikon, Canon, Olympus and Kodak have digital cameras to suit every pocket and every use. There are even numerous smaller companies building digital cameras to suit this ever growing market.

Nikon D3300 - Choosing A New Digital Camera
Photo: Amazon.com

For a first time buyer the choice can be so bewildering, so just you choose which camera will suit yours. The basics of choosing a digital camera are to know your budget, know what type of pictures you want to take and how you intend to use the pictures. For the beginner setting a budget on your camera purchase will soon cut down the choice to a manageable level. Ask yourself, are you just gong to take the odd holiday snap if a one off picture opportunity comes up or are you the type who likes to fully document each holiday you have, maybe you’re a habitual holiday snapper from digital times?

If you are the type who only takes a picture on holiday if you see something truly inspiring or just to document that you did attend then go for the lower price end. Once you have established your budget consider the type of pictures you’ll be taking. Are you likely to be taking pictures everywhere you go? Consider the weight and size of the camera you need. Are you likely to be taking pictures of friends and relatives on location or do you have an eye for the picturesque panoramas?

Maybe consider a zoom lens, for panoramas go optical for family shots a digital zoom with flash may suffice. Are you a habitual snapper when the cameras in your hand or an opportunist clicker? Consider the size of memory you’ll require. The opportunist may not require huge lumps of memory but a habitual snapper may be different. Think about battery life. If your going to take a few shots a day you’ll need a better battery life than if you take the odd snap. Once you have chosen the best combination of size, weight, memory, battery life and zoom for your uses, consider how you will use your pictures.

Canon T5 Bundle v2 - Choosing A New Digital Camera
Image: Amazon.com

If you need to print large pictures off your computer beware the more megapixels or resolution, you have the better. It is a sure thing that the higher the megapixels the more expensive the camera, so leave this choice till last. For a beginner spending your budget on a camera based on megapixels initially will lead to a poor choice with a camera that does have the other characteristics to suit your purposes.

If you generally print off the more traditional photo sizes for an album do not be to concerned with the number of megapixels, most base model digital cameras will give you an adequate print. Exposure modes are simply where does the camera take a light reading? The cheaper cameras just do an all over reading which can be very limiting to say the least. A good camera will have a “spot”, “centre weighted” and “matrix” metering system, which allows you to take great photos in any light situation. When buying a digital camera, buy it for the fact that it’s a camera not a video camera as well.

The only thing that it didn’t do well was take still pictures. If you want to take really great pictures that will be in your family for years put in a little effort with your new digital camera. You can get so much out of your new digital camera! you just have to put some time in for learning how to use it properly and how to take better pictures, remember no one will ever want to look at a poor quality photo twice.

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